This Week in Pittsburgh History: Frick Park Opens for Public Use

FrickPark

The park began when Henry Clay Frick, upon his death in 1919, bequeathed 151 acres south of Clayton, his Point Breeze mansion (which is now part of the Frick Art & Historical Center). He also arranged for a $2 million trust fund for long-term maintenance for the park, which opened on June 25, 1927.

Henry Clay Frick’s son, Childs Frick, developed his lifelong love of animals in the woods and ravines of the park. Childs Frick went on to be a renowned American vertebrate paleontologist, major benefactor and trustee of the American Museum of Natural History.

Over the years, the park grew from the original land in Point Breeze, and now includes Squirrel Hill to the border of Edgewood. It is one of the few areas of a city that Frick helped industrialize, where steep ravines and mature woods remain relatively undisturbed, forming a nature reserve of native plants and abundant wildlife. Owls, amphibians, wild turkey, fox, and many mammal species are found in the park.

Known as Pittsburgh’s woodland park for its extensive trails throughout steep valleys and wooded slopes, Frick Park is an ideal escape from the noise of the city. Birding enthusiasts love to visit Clayton Hill, where well over 100 species of birds have been recorded. Children flock to the famous Blue Slide Playground and learn about nature at the Frick Environmental Center. The park also features red clay tennis courts, baseball fields, and the only public lawn bowling green in Pennsylvania.

Find out more about Frick Park at their official website…HERE!

 

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